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Article
November 28, 1908

THE OCULAR REACTION TO TUBERCULIN.WITH REPORT OF 202 CASES.

JAMA. 1908;LI(22):1836-1838. doi:10.1001/jama.1908.25410220008002b
Abstract

The necessity for the early recognition of tuberculosis was never more apparent than it is to-day. The difficulties attending the recognition of this affection in its incipiency are numerous, this being especially true of obscure lesions of the lymphatic glands, bones, joints, viscera and nervous system. Infection of these structures with the tubercle bacillus frequently gives rise to indefinite and ill-defined symptoms and signs which often leave us in great doubt as to the nature of the underlying pathologic process. With the introduction of refined methods of diagnosis we are able to arrive at earlier and more definite conclusions. The employment of tuberculin subcutaneously proved to be a valuable addition to our diagnostic armamentarium, but this use of tuberculin subcutaneously is attended with numerous objections and dangers which are too well known to require repetition at this time.

The simultaneous introduction of the ophthalmic test by Calmette1 of Lille,

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