[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.156.39.245. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
January 9, 1909

THE LAST PART OF THE HUMAN HEART TO DIE

JAMA. 1909;LII(2):141. doi:10.1001/jama.1909.02540280055009
Abstract

Physiologists and clinicians are alike interested in the problem of the portion of the heart responsible for the initiation of its rhythmic impulses. Research in recent years has tended toward the localization of this primary automatic center either in the sinus region or in the great veins behind the sinus. This study in the human heart is complicated somewhat by the fact that the sinus region is not so well separated from the auricle or atrium as it is in the lower animals, on which much of the experimental work has been done. An interesting observation has recently been made by W. Koch.1 This observer had the opportunity of examining the dying heart of a human fetus and of comparing the phenomena there with the dying process in the rabbit's heart. He finds that the part of the heart which continues to contract longest during the death process is

×