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Article
March 6, 1909

THE INFLUENCE OF CALCIUM AND CITRIC ACID ON BLOOD COAGULATION

JAMA. 1909;LII(10):778-779. doi:10.1001/jama.1909.02540360034010
Abstract

Since Wright's researches in 1893 the salts of calcium have been widely used in various conditions in which the coagulability of the blood was thought to be reduced. At that time Wright claimed that single doses of calcium chlorid would reduce the coagulation time, in some instances, from 60 to 70 per cent. The general idea underlying calcium therapy has been that the internal administration of the calcium salts increased the calcium in the blood, and this induced more rapid coagulation. Citric acid, on the other hand, reduces the calcium content of the blood, and its internal administration is claimed to decrease the coagulability of the blood. While these effects have been experimentally demonstrated, it has still been a question whether or not the increase or decrease in calcium in human blood, produced by the administration of calcium salts or citric acid, was great enough to cause an increase or

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