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Article
March 27, 1909

SIMPLE FRACTURE: SOME POINTS IN ITS DIAGNOSIS AND OPERATIVE TREATMENT

Author Affiliations

Professor of Surgery, Cornell University NEW YORK

JAMA. 1909;LII(13):1005-1007. doi:10.1001/jama.1909.25420390001001
Abstract

I. DIAGNOSIS  The recognition of a complete fracture of a long bone of a limb is usually so easy as to be within the scope of any one who knows that there is a bone in the limb. The injury presents two signs, which are readily recognized and which in the systematic presentation of the means of diagnosis have obtained much prominence and are habitually given as the positive signs of fracture, namely, abnormal mobility and crepitus. The rule is precise: If abnormal mobility and crepitus can be found, a fracture exists. The mind, perhaps unconsciously, is prone to go further and to assume that if abnormal mobility and crepitus can not be found a fracture does not exist. And unfortunately, while in a large proportion of the cases of fracture in which these two signs are found the diagnosis can be readily made without their aid, in most of

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