[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
March 27, 1909

THE INCIDENCE OF TUBERCLE BACILLI IN NEW YORK CITY MILK: WITH A STUDY OF ITS EFFECTS ON A SERIES OF CHILDREN

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Research Laboratory, Board of Health, New York.

JAMA. 1909;LII(13):1011-1016. doi:10.1001/jama.1909.25420390007001b
Abstract

One of the most important questions to-day which confronts those fighting the spread of tuberculosis is: What proportion of infection is human, what proportion bovine in origin? It is not necessary for me to review in this place the various answers that are given this question by sincere and capable workers in the same or different countries. In the United States we find Theobald Smith1 stating that, in his opinion, not over 1 per cent, of human tuberculosis is of bovine origin, and, on the contrary, others — for example, Ravenel2—believing that a considerable percentage of the disease is of this origin. The British Tuberculosis Commission recently reported that "a very considerable amount of disease and loss of life, especially among the young, must be attributed to the consumption of cow's milk containing tubercle bacilli." The opposite view of Professor Koch is known to all. In view

×