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April 3, 1909

THE NEED FOR A SCHOOL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE IN THE UNITED STATES

Author Affiliations

Assistant in Bacteriology, Harvard Medical School; Formerly Demonstrator and Research Assistant, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine WEST SOMERVILLE, MASS.

JAMA. 1909;LII(14):1099-1100. doi:10.1001/jama.1909.25420400025001i

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Abstract

Now that the time has arrived when the English and German schools of tropical medicine may celebrate their decennial year, it is fitting again to bring up the question of establishing a school of tropical medicine in this country. I say "again," because nearly all of our leading medical journals ten years ago advocated the establishment of a course of tropical medicine in every medical school, and they have kept occasionally reminding us ever since of the importance of such study. Two well-known journals, one in 1898 and the other in 1899, advocated the establishment of a special school for the subject. Let us see what objections have been made to such a school.

The chief arguments used against the establishment of a school of tropical medicine are: 1. The government already has three, the medical schools of the army and navy and the laboratory of the Public Health and

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