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Article
April 17, 1909

EXPERIMENTAL LUNG ANTHRACOSIS: PRELIMINARY NOTE

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO

JAMA. 1909;LII(16):1252-1253. doi:10.1001/jama.1909.25420420032003e
Abstract

The intestinal origin of lung anthracosis was suggested in 1862 by Villaret,1 but denied in 1885 by Arnold,2 who asserted that the small amount of absorption which he had observed following the feeding of charcoal emulsions was not sufficient evidence on which to accept this theory.

In December, 1905, appeared the first of a series of articles by Van Steenburg and Grysez3 of Calmette's laboratory, in which they showed that particles of carbon when injected into the stomach or peritoneal cavity of adult animals were promptly absorbed by the lymph ducts of the mesentery and diaphragm, carried through the thorax to the veins returning to the right heart and finally deposited in the lungs. It was noted that with young animals this result was not obtained.

Following the work of Calmette, Van Steenburg, Grysez, Sommerville4 and others, Petit5 reported the results of his experiments with

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