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Article
April 24, 1909

THE APPROPRIATE INSIGNIA FOR THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

JAMA. 1909;LII(17):1325-1327. doi:10.1001/jama.1909.25420430021002f

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Abstract

An emblem, to be appropriate, should be so devised as to convey a meaning suitable to the organization which carries it as a badge; therefore it seems strange that the American Medical Association should have adopted for its use the device of the red cross, which belongs to another organization and represents a character of work entirely different from that of the medical profession.

The American National Red Cross, through its executive committee, passed resolutions Oct. 18, 1907, which decided that by reason of an international agreement the emblem of the red cross was adopted to designate the personnel of sanitary corps, and was to be used in time of peace or war to protect sanitary formations, establishments and personnel and material.

Furthermore, in order that the emblem should be kept in its proper place, legislation has been recommended to prevent its use by private persons or by societies, and

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