[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
June 12, 1909

EPILEPSIA PARTIALIS CONTINUA OCCURRING IN CEREBRAL SYPHILIS: REPORT OF A CASE, WITH OPERATION

Author Affiliations

Professor of Neuropathology and Associate Professor of Neurology in the University of Pennsylvania; Professor of Clinical Surgery in the University of Pennsylvania PHILADELPHIA

From the Philadelphia General Hospital and from the Laboratory of Neuropathology of the University of Pennsylvania.

JAMA. 1909;LII(24):1921-1922. doi:10.1001/jama.1909.25420500023002f
Abstract

It seems almost incredible that any form of epilepsy should exist and yet not be well recognized. The literature of this disease is very extensive, and much of it contains little that is new. There is a type of epilepsy, however, which does not appear in the text-books, and even in the most recent writings receives scant recognition. Thus, Oppenheim1 mentions it in a few lines by stating that cases occur in which during the interparoxysmal period muscular twitchings of short duration and without loss of consciousness are observed in one or another portion of the body. It has been described, especially by Russian writers, as "epilepsia continua" (Koshewnikow, Muratoff, Bechterew); Bruns also mentions it.

The cases differ from those of myoclonic epilepsy; the twitchings are limited to a small portion of the body, and are more intense than in myoclonia.

The name, "epilepsia partialis continua," seems to have

×