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Article
July 3, 1909

A MODIFIED "CORNELL" X-RAY TUBE

Author Affiliations

KANSAS CITY, MO.

JAMA. 1909;LIII(1):29-30. doi:10.1001/jama.1909.92550010034003a
Abstract

About one year ago Geyser,1 of New York, described an x-ray tube of new and novel design. This appliance, which he called the "Cornell" tube, was made of heavy lead glass, with the exception of a circular window of flint glass for the passage of the rays. When the tube was in use, this window was applied to the skin, the glass being tightly pressed against the area to be treated.

The principal claim advanced for the new apparatus was that when properly employed long exposures could be given without danger of burning the patient. In over 5,000 cases Geyser had never seen any untoward results. Lesser factors in favor of its more general adoption were the increased effect secured from exposures at the closest possible range, the protection of the operator without the intervention of extra shields, and the

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