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July 10, 1909

THE TREATMENT OF ANEMIA IN INFANCY WITH CITRATE OF IRON ADMINISTERED SUBCUTANEOUSLY

Author Affiliations

Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School; Associate Visiting Physician at the Children's and Infants' Hospitals; Visiting Physician at the Floating Hospital BOSTON

JAMA. 1909;LIII(2):107-108. doi:10.1001/jama.1909.92550020003002c
Abstract

The percentage of hemoglobin in infancy gradually rises from 55 per cent. to 60 per cent. at the end of the first month to 70 per cent. at six months, where it remains during the rest of infancy. The number of red corpuscles in infancy varies between 5,500,000 and 6,000,000. Compared with the adult, therefore, in the infant the hemoglobin is relatively low. This comparative deficiency in hemoglobin is presumably due to the fact that the infant normally receives an insufficient supply of iron in its food and that the reserve of iron present in the liver at birth is not large enough to keep the percentage of hemoglobin at the adult standard This reserve of iron may, moreover, be insufficient and in any event is comparatively easily exhausted.

It is probable that the disease chlorosis never occurs in infancy. The chlorotic type

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