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Article
July 17, 1909

EXPERIMENTAL PRESSURE ATROPHY OF THE THYROID: WITH BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE PRESENT KNOWLEDGE OF THE GLAND

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Hull Physiological Laboratory, University of Chicago; read before the Chicago Medical Society, April 14, 1909.

JAMA. 1909;LIII(3):172-178. doi:10.1001/jama.1909.92550030007002b
Abstract

INTRODUCTION  Up to a little over a hundred years ago, very scant attention was paid to pathologic conditions of the thyroid. In fact, endemic strumæ, at least in goitrous territories, were considered quite natural and even beneficial. The sporadic cases were, as a rule, confounded with tuberculous adenitis. Not until 1800, when Fodéré first described the difference between struma and cretinism, did the thyroid begin to attract any special attention.During the last century such men as Eulenberg, St. Lager, Bircher, Wollfer, Kocher and others devoted much time and labor to study of the gland. Fresh stimulus was infused into the work by the occurrence of the condition now known as "cachexia strumipriva" following complete extirpation of the thyroid; by the discovery of iodin in the gland of Bauman, and by experimental work on the organ by Cyon.In recent years the medical

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