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Article
August 7, 1909

THE INCIDENCE AND CAUSES OF TUBERCULOUS HEMOPTYSIS: A STATISTICAL STUDY

Author Affiliations

Professor of Medicine and Clinical Medicine in the Medico-Chirurgical College PHILADELPHIA

JAMA. 1909;LIII(6):455-457. doi:10.1001/jama.1909.92550060002002g
Abstract

Hemoptysis is regarded as an important and much-dreaded symptom of pulmonary tuberculosis. Any new light shed on its etiology, therefore, must be welcomed. At the outset I desire to present a few facts bearing on the direct or pathologic etiology of hemoptysis, and, considered from this point of view, the cases fall naturally under two heads: (a) those caused by congestion of the bronchial mucosa and lung texture, and (b) those due to ulceration or erosion of blood vessels or rupture of miliary aneurisms.

A BLOOD-SPITTING CAUSED BY PULMONARY CONGESTION  It may be pertinently questioned, as pointed out by Garland, whether the degree of hyperemia in other acute or chronic affections of the lungs does not exceed that of the early stage of pulmonary tuberculosis, in which, however, there is a more marked tendency toward hemorrhages. It is undoubted that

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