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Article
August 14, 1909

THE ETIOLOGY AND TREATMENT OF THE SO-CALLED SUMMER DIARRHEA IN INFANTS

Author Affiliations

Instructor In Pediatrics, Rush Medical College; Pediatrician to Provident and St. Bernard's Hotel Dieu Hospitals CHICAGO

JAMA. 1909;LIII(7):525-527. doi:10.1001/jama.1909.92550070016002e
Abstract

Six or seven years ago there were carried out under the supervision of the Rockefeller Institute extensive bacteriologic examinations of the stools of infants suffering from summer diarrhea, with especial regard to the presence of the B. dysentericus.1 Not only the Rockefeller Institute, but many hospitals and laboratories undertook at the same time the same careful research. The results of these researches seemed at first to throw some light on the etiology of this affection. Not only was the B. dysentericus (usually of the Flexner type) found frequently, but in some of the cases agglutinis were found in the blood. Soon after these researches in the east, Weaver2 published a series of examinations by which he was able to show that the dysentery bacillus was to be found in the stools of infants suffering with summer diarrhea in only

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