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Article
October 16, 1909

INSECT CARRIERS OF TYPHOID FEVER

Author Affiliations

PITTSBURG, PA.

JAMA. 1909;LIII(16):1248-1252. doi:10.1001/jama.1909.92550160001001a
Abstract

The events brought about by the Spanish-American war marked the beginning of the greatest epoch in the history of preventive medicine in America. The arrest of the growth and propagation of certain mosquitoes—anopheles, culex, and stegomyia—has blazed the way for the greatest achievements of modern times.

FLIES  Insect carriers of disease have not, until a comparatively recent date, received any impressive attention from medical observers. The mosquito was, perhaps, the first insect to receive due attention. Its importance as a host in malaria, yellow fever, and other diseases has been thoroughly established.The common house-fly (Musca domestica), since time immemorial, has been a common nuisance of all countries, civilized and uncivilized. My first observations of the house-fly as a carrier of disease were made in army camps during the Spanish-American war. It is well known that the army camps of this war

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