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Article
October 16, 1909

A STUDY OF THE ANATOMY AND THE CLINICAL IMPORTANCE OF THE SACROILIAC JOINT

Author Affiliations

Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery, College of Physicians and Surgeons and Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital; Visiting Surgeon, Home for Crippled Children Hawthorne. NEW YORK

From the anatomic laboratory of Cornell University Medical College.

JAMA. 1909;LIII(16):1273-1276. doi:10.1001/jama.1909.92550160001001g
Abstract

Some time ago the writer was much surprised, on reading the literature of the minute anatomy of the sacro-iliac joint or synchondrosis, to find such a marked disagreement among the most prominent anatomists and gynecologists. To quote in brief from some of them: Morris holds that even the presence of synovial membrane is not constant, stating that it is more apt to be present in the female. Luschka believes that a small amount of synovial membrane is always present and that it increases in size at times of pregnancy. Cunningham states that the synovial cavity is imperfect and rudimentary, but believes that hyaline articular cartilage exists usually. Testut, the great French anatomist, mentions certain folds of synovial membrane which occur here and there, filling up gaps or margins of the fibrocartilage. Morris denies that there is any appreciable movement at this synchondrosis. Williams (in 1903) states that "the articulation between

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