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Article
November 20, 1909

THE HISTORY OF TWO CASES OF CONGENITAL PYLORIC SPASM: WITH REMARKS ON THE ETIOLOGY AND TREATMENT

Author Affiliations

Visiting Physician to the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia ATLANTIC CITY, N. J.

JAMA. 1909;LIII(21):1722-1725. doi:10.1001/jama.1909.92550210001001e
Abstract

The title of this paper is a misnomer, if it conveys the impression that by "pyloric spasm" is meant the mild and common affection described by Pfaundler1 and Cautley2 under this name and evidently considered by them a condition quite distinct from and not likely to be confounded with congenital hypertrophic stenosis, but which, from the description of these writers, seems identical with the habitual or chronic vomiting of infancy. An unbiased study of the already voluminous literature on this subject is, to my mind, convincing that there occurs, under the term "congenital pyloric stenosis," a group of cases in which spasm of the pylorus and adjacent gastric walls is the principal, and often the only, abnormal condition present. This group comprises the majority of the cases of so-called congenital pyloric stenosis encountered in practice, and embraces those of infants who recover entirely under intelligent dietetic

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