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Article
November 20, 1909

OPACITIES OF THE CORNEA: THEIR FREQUENCY IN CHILDHOOD FROM PREVENTABLE CAUSES AND THEIR EFFECT ON VISION

JAMA. 1909;LIII(21):1733-1735. doi:10.1001/jama.1909.92550210001001i
Abstract

Ophthalmology has been regarded as a field not distinct from general medicine, but comprising problems such as refraction and special surgery, which require so thorough a training as to deter the practitioner of medicine. It is obvious that this attitude is deplorable, as it tends to make the specialist in reality narrow as well as to deprive the practitioner of information at first hand which is often of great value.

The ophthalmoscope has become an instrument of precision in the hands of every careful diagnostician. Gower's "Medical Ophthalmoscopy," the excellent translations of Haab's atlases, and articles by Bull, de Schweinitz, Duane, Knapp, and Risley, who has drawn attention to the importance of hygiene in the care of the eyes of school children—these writings and many others have awakened an interest in ocular problems, and the questions which this paper will raise will

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