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Article
November 20, 1909

AN ISOLATED NEURITIS OF A SENSORY FILAMENT OF A PERIPHERAL NERVE-TRUNK

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

JAMA. 1909;LIII(21):1735-1736. doi:10.1001/jama.1909.92550210033002

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Abstract

The peripheral nerve-trunks of the extremities, being composed of mixed motor and sensory fibers, when in a state of irritation or inflammation, will give rise to both motor and sensory phenomena. This is a common observation. An isolated involvement of either motor or sensory nerve fibers is sometimes observed. We are very familiar with motor neuritis and sensory neuritis. For example, in multiple neuritis caused by lead intoxication, motor phenomena (palsy) are almost exclusively present and the sensory disturbances are usually nil. In syphilis a sensory multiple neuritis may be alone present for a long time. Alcoholic neuritis may be also exclusively sensory.

If now we consider the individual branches of the main nerve-trunks of the extremities isolated, we find that palsies or inflammations of the motor divisions are not rare, but a neuritis of a sensory filament, judging from the neurological literature

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