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Article
December 25, 1909

PUS TUBES IN THE MALE: SURGICAL AND VACCINE TREATMENT

JAMA. 1909;LIII(26):2141-2143. doi:10.1001/jama.1909.92550260001001
Abstract

The pus infections of the urinary duct have been for centuries the object of clinical study and surgical exploration; those of the less conspicuous seminal duct remained virtually unexplored until the twentieth century. Pus tubes in the male are to-day as generally unrecognized and surgically ignored as were the pus tubes of the female thirty years ago. Even the accessible epididymis has constantly harbored gonorrheal pus, until recently undetected and undisturbed by surgery.

CLINICAL ANATOMY  Four anatomical features of the seminal duct are clinically important:1. Ampulla and vesicle are closed by a sphincter of smooth muscle. This muscle, generally ignored by clinicians and anatomists alike, was first described by Kölliker,1 was named by Hyrtl2 the "adductor"' of the seminal vesicles, and is figured by Bardeleben and Haeckel3 as the "interampullary muscle." Careful dissection, however, reveals it as a true "compressor ductium seminalium," whose contraction closes the orifices of ampullæ

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