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Article
January 1, 1910

PRINCIPLES UNDERLYING SURGERY OF THE SPLEEN: WITH A REPORT OF TEN SPLENECTOMIES

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.

JAMA. 1910;LIV(1):14-18. doi:10.1001/jama.1910.92550270001001e
Abstract

Our knowledge of the function of the spleen has been so vague, and our ability accurately to determine its physical proportions so unreliable, that it has been impossible to recognize diseased conditions until they reached a stage so advanced that splenectomy became a necessary consequence. Therefore, surgery of the spleen has been destructive in character. Recent investigations lead to the speculation that many of the anemias and associated blood states may ultimately be best treated by operative procedures directed to the spleen and other blood-forming organs.

In its ontogeny the spleen probably goes back to a time before the development of the cerebrospinal nervous system. This is indicated by the fact that its only known nerve supply consists of filaments derived from the splanchnic sympathetic to the capsule, stimulation of which causes contraction. It is an organ of internal secretion controlled by chemical stimulation through the blood stream, in many

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