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Article
February 12, 1910

THE COMPENSATING ACUTENESS OF THE SENSES OF THE BLIND

JAMA. 1910;LIV(7):541-542. doi:10.1001/jama.1910.02550330039007
Abstract

It is a common belief, shared with the populace by some physicians, that the blind are compensated for their misfortune to some extent by a greater acuteness of the remaining senses. That this is probably not the case was shown by observations made by Kunz and Griesbach at the Mülhausen (Germany) Institution for the Blind. The results of these observations were given in substance by Dr. J. G. McKendrick, who has recently published1 a communication from a blind man whose personal experience agrees with the results of the German observers. It may be admitted that the physical tests employed in modern experimental psychology fail to show any greater development of the remaining senses of the blind than of the same senses in normal individuals. Of course, these tests do not disprove the greater relative usefulness of the remaining senses of the blind, for, it should be remembered, such methods are

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