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February 19, 1910

THE IMPORTANCE OF ANIMAL EXPERIMENTATION IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF OUR KNOWLEDGE OF DYSENTERY, CHOLERA AND TYPHOID FEVER

JAMA. 1910;LIV(8):588-590. doi:10.1001/jama.1910.92550340001001a
Abstract

Before successful warfare can be waged against an infectious disease it is of the highest importance, if, indeed, it is not absolutely necessary, to know with precision the nature of the agent which produces that disease, how it invades the individual, what its method of action is, how it is excreted, and, finally, how it perpetuates itself outside the living body.

In studying the possible causes for any such infectious process, the suspected causative agents must be applied under strict scientific control either to members of the human or of the animal species to see whether under fixed conditions there is a definite relation between the suspected causes and the effects produced by them.

Typhoid fever, cholera and dysentery are diseases associated symptomatically and pathologically, in the great majority of instances, with the intestinal tract, and in the search for the causes of these diseases it was natural that study

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