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Article
April 9, 1910

THREE CASES OF INFECTION WITH THE DWARF TAPEWORM (HYMENOLEPIS NANA) IN CHILDREN

JAMA. 1910;LIV(15):1206-1207. doi:10.1001/jama.1910.92550410001001m
Abstract

During the past eighteen months I have encountered 20 cases of infection with the dwarf tapeworm in children, 14 of which have been reported in a previous paper.1 Three of the six additional cases encountered present points of sufficient interest to warrant an additional report.

Since the paper of Stiles2 in 1903, a number of cases of infection with Hymenolepis nana have been reported in this country. Stiles predicted that the dwarf tapeworm was going to prove a common American parasite, and from my experience it is one of the commonest intestinal worms in children.

The dwarf tapeworm is the smallest cestode parasite of man, and great numbers of the worms are usually present in the infected cases. In the cases in which I have been able to make an estimate, the number of worms passed after treatment has ranged from 50 to over 2,000.

The presence of

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