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Article
April 23, 1910

THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION—ITS POLICIES AND ITS WORKVI. THE CHEMICAL LABORATORY

JAMA. 1910;LIV(17):1378-1379. doi:10.1001/jama.1910.02550430030003

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Abstract

To those who have given the matter any thought it must seem remarkable that until the establishment of the Council on Pharmacy and Chemistry five years ago there was no disinterested, reliable body to which physicians could apply for information regarding proprietary—or for that matter regarding any—medicinal products. That a physician had no means of obtaining unbiased scientific data on the preparations he was using daily in the treatment of disease seems on its face an anomaly. Such was the case, however, and the result was that all information concerning proprietary medicines had to come from those who were commercially interested in their sale. That information from such a source would be so biased as to be well-nigh worthless for scientific purposes might have been expected; that itwas worthless has been demonstrated.

By far the most important work of the Council has been that of determining the actual composition—as

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