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Article
May 21, 1910

THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION—ITS POLICIES AND ITS WORKVII. MEDICAL EDUCATION

JAMA. 1910;LIV(21):1694-1696. doi:10.1001/jama.1910.02550470034003
Abstract

The low educational standards which have obtained and which to a large degree still obtain in many American medical schools have long been deplored. It was not to be expected that a new and rapidly developing country like this should at once have schools of the same high grade as those found in the older countries; but there was no legitimate excuse for the fact that conditions with us were worse than in any of the other new countries—Canada, Australia, New Zealand, etc. The lack of legal restrictions in the organization and incorporation of medical colleges undoubtedly has been largely responsible for the existence of the great number of mediocre and low-grade medical educational institutions. As is well known the birth of the American Medical Association was the result of a convention called in May, 1846, to consider the subject of a higher standard of medical education. After the Association

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