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Article
May 28, 1910

PANCREATITIS FROM THE STANDPOINT OF THE CLINICAL SURGEON

Author Affiliations

Surgeon-in-Chief, Augustana Hospital and St. Mary's Hospital; Professor of Clinical Surgery in the Medical Department of the University of Illinois CHICAGO

JAMA. 1910;LIV(22):1776-1778. doi:10.1001/jama.1910.92550480001001f
Abstract

Since the surgeon has come to consider pancreatitis habitually with the same uniform system that he considers all other important intra-abdominal pathologic conditions, our appreciation of its importance as well as our knowledge of this condition have acquired reasonable dimensions.

ETIOLOGY  In 1895 my attention was directed to the practical side of the subject during a visit to Mayo Robson's clinic in Leeds, but it was only after his enthusiastic presentation1 before the International Congress in Paris in 1900 that I really awoke to an appreciation of the value of his observations. Undoubtedly, the infection usually travels up the common duct into the gall-bladder where there is a possibility for the accumulation of a large quantity of infected bile mixed with mucus, which on its way down the common duct is easily diverted into the pancreatic duct if there is obstruction owing to the presence of gall-stones or of edema

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