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Article
June 4, 1910

CAN STAMMERNG BE TREATED SUCCESSFULLY THROUGH THE AGENCY OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOL?

JAMA. 1910;LIV(23):1859-1861. doi:10.1001/jama.1910.92550490006002h

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Abstract

The official recognition by a department of a large American municipality of stammering as a public problem, is fraught with too great possibilities to go unheeded. Constituting as it does an initiatory effort in the United States, it is more than likely, if correctly taken and successful in its results, to awaken a country-wide movement of untoldadvantage to an unfortunate class of sufferers. The schools very naturally have been first to realize this problem, as they have before been the first to realize other problemsconcerning abnormalities in children. The educator not only comes into contact with the stammering child, but his professional attitude demands recognition of his disorder; for hindrances to developmental progress of whatsoever character are, from his point of view, to be removed, and the child graduated into the mature world unburdened with recoverable abnormalities. But since stammering children have always been in the schools, it is to

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