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July 20, 1912

THE PRESENT STATUS OF LIGATION OR EXCISION OF THE PELVIC VEINS IN THE TREATMENT OF SEPTIC THROMBOPHLEBITIS OF PUERPERAL ORIGIN

JAMA. 1912;LIX(3):157-160. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04270070158001
Abstract

The task of formulating the indications for the surgical treatment of puerperal septic infection still affords a source of prolific discussion. It seems impossible to agree on established rules as has been done in suppurative appendicitis, gall-bladder infection, or suppurative otitis media. Some of the confusion has undoubtedly arisen from the fact that we have no reliable clinical or laboratory guide to aid us in determining a reasonable prognosis, from the difficulty of differentiating the complex lesions, and to a certain extent, from the antipathy for serious surgical operations on the lying-in woman. It must be said, however, that our ideas are gradually crystallizing, that conservatism prevails, and that, owing to a better conception of puerperal processes in general, surgical measures are adopted with more care and discrimination.

During the past ten years the possibility of saving by operation the lives of women suffering from puerperal pyemia has received a

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