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Article
July 27, 1912

EXPERIMENTAL POLIOMYELITIS IN MONKEYS: THIRTEENTH NOTE: SURVIVAL OF THE POLIOMYELITIC VIRUS IN THE STOMACH AND INTESTINE

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research.

JAMA. 1912;LIX(4):273. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04270070272010
Abstract

The view of the nasopharyngeal site of entrance into and exit from the infected body of the poliomyelitic virus has steadily gained support from experiments on monkeys1 and from observations on cases of epidemic poliomyelitis in man. The recent observations of Kling, Wernstedt and Pettersson2 of Stockholm have an especially important bearing on this subject. These observers have demonstrated the virus by inoculations made into monkeys, in the mucus contained in washings from the nose and mouth of acute examples of poliomyelitis both during life in patients who recovered, and after death in individuals who succumbed. The virus had previously been detected by inoculation tests in the nasal3 and buccal mucosa, and in the tonsils3, 4 in fatal human cases of the disease. The findings of Kling, Wernstedt and Pettersson would appear not only to complete the chain of evidence in support of the nasopharyngeal route of

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