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Article
August 10, 1912

CLEFT PALATES: WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE CLOSING OF A SURGICAL CLEFT BY THE USE OF A DENTAL APPLIANCE

Author Affiliations

Professor of Prosthetic Dentistry, University of Pittsburgh PITTSBURGH

JAMA. 1912;LIX(6):425-427. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04270080107007
Abstract

One of the most distressing deformities to which the human frame is liable is found in the defective condition known to the dentist and surgeon as cleft palate. The infortunate sufferer is compelled, in a great measure, to be an alien among his fellows and an object of compassion to the considerate; and is often made painfully conscious of notice by the heartless crowd. Were he gifted with the power and eloquence of a Demosthenes he could make little more use of his endowments than if he were a mute.

In times past, one so afflicted was doomed to go through life suffering from his deformity with no hope of relief, but thanks to the advancement of both surgical and mechanical means this imperfection may at least be remedied and often cured.

There are two distinct classes of palatine defects: acquired and congenital.

The first includes all loss of tissue

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