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Article
August 17, 1912

FOUR CASES OF TYPHUS FEVER (BRILL'S DISEASE) IN ONE FAMILY: WITH SUCCESSFUL INOCULATION INTO GUINEA-PIGS AND MONKEY

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From Research Laboratory, Department of Health, New York.

JAMA. 1912;LIX(7):521-523. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04270080203009

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Abstract

The recent work of Anderson and Goldberger of the Hygienic Laboratory at Washington establishing, experimentally, the identity of typhus fever and so-called Brill's disease, together with the mode of transmission of typhus fever by body-lice as shown by these writers, and Nicolle and his co-workers abroad, and by head-lice as lately shown by Anderson and Goldberger, greatly increase the interest in cases of what we must now regard as endemic typhus fever, so well studied by Drs. Brill, Louria and others as it occurs in this country and especially in New York City.

For many months before the occurrence of those reported, no cases of typhus fever had occurred in New York to the best of our knowledge. Those that we present are unique in the history of the endemic form of the disease as it has been studied in New York, in that they affected four members of one

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