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Article
August 17, 1912

ERYTHROMELALGIA: REPORT OF A CASE PRESENTING PERIPHERAL VASOMOTOR DISTURBANCES IN THE HANDS AND FEET FOR TWELVE YEARS, REACHING A CLIMAX IN EIGHT YEARS, WITH RECOVERY FOLLOWING TREATMENT BY SUPRARENAL SUBSTANCE

Author Affiliations

Neurologist to Denver City and County, Mercy and St. Joseph's Hospitals DENVER

JAMA. 1912;LIX(7):532-535. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04270080214012
Abstract

The case record which forms the substance of this paper I believe to be of unusual interest. Aside from the recovery of an undoubted case of a disease in which recovery is so rare, the light which the result of the treatment instituted may throw on the association of the internal secretions with the pathology of this vasomotor neurosis is believed to warrant its presentation.

It seems unnecessary to discuss the symptomatology and its variations in extenso, or the relation to other vascular neuroses, more than to share the opinion of Cassirer,1 who after analyzing ninety observations reported as erythromelalgia, believed the majority belonged to other conditions.

As to cause, it may be said with Oppenheim,2 that "nothing is positively known as to the termination of the condition nor can we say anything definite as to its cause."

Further, it is not without considerable hesitancy that one advocates

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