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Article
September 14, 1912

THE INFLUENCE OF PATHOLOGIC CONDITIONS ON THE ACTION OF DRUGS

JAMA. 1912;LIX(11):839-842. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04270090083004
Abstract

There is no doubt that much confusion has resulted in the past years from the attempt to transfer the results of pharmacologic experiments directly to the practice of therapeutics. The pharmacologist, by repeated experiments and careful analysis of his results, obtains facts and reaches conclusions which appear to be beyond contradiction. Yet when the clinician, applying the knowledge so acquired, arrives at results at variance to those of the pharmacologist, he is at a loss to understand the seeming discrepancy and very naturally views the laboratory work with some skepticism.

The main difficulty lies in the assumptions drawn from pharmacologic experiments. These as a rule are carried out on normal animals; the drugs are given usually in large dosage and in such a manner that they quickly reach the tissue to be acted on. If the exact conditions of theexperiments are defined and if the work is carefully done, then

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