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Article
September 21, 1912

CESAREAN SECTION DONE UNDER SPINAL ANESTHESIA FOR ECLAMPSIA: REPORT OF THREE CASES

Author Affiliations

Attending Surgeon, Samaritan Hospital, and Consulting Surgeon, Leonard Hospital TROY, N. Y.

JAMA. 1912;LIX(12):940-941. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04270090184011
Abstract

Case 1.  —Mrs. E. W. L., aged 32, was admitted to the Samaritan Hospital, Troy, N. Y., Nov. 28, 1911, having been referred to my service by Dr. Thurman Hull.About five years previously, she had two miscarriages and with both there were convulsive attacks, although she is said to have had no albumin in the urine at that time. The day before admission to the hospital, when between seven and eight months pregnant, she was taken suddenly with convulsive attacks, and thereafter had a convulsion about every half hour until her admission, at which time the bowels were moving involuntarily and there was a small amount of blood coming from the vagina. The pulse at 70 was of a fairly good quality. The temperature was 99.3 F. The urine was said to contain a large quantity of albumin. The skin was pale and very dry. The pupils were mid-wide

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