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September 21, 1912

THE PROPER PROVISION FOR TEACHING OPHTHALMOLOGY IN THE MEDICAL SCHOOLS

JAMA. 1912;LIX(12):1055-1060. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04270090299054

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Abstract

Ophthalmology, always a distinct department of medicine, embraced a great mass of clinical facts, as shown in the books of Mackenzie and Desmarres, before the work of Helmholtz, Graefe and Bonders caused its rapid extension in the middle of the nineteenth century. Walton, Lawrence, Bowman, Sichel, Stellwag and other able men had found it an ample field for a life time of study.

The routine use of the ophthalmoscope and the test lenses enormously increased the extent and practical importance of this branch of medicine. It inspired able men of the younger generation with an interest that made it their life work. Jaeger, Arlt, Schweigger, Argyll Robertson are only specimen names from those of the host who, fifty years ago, saw in ophthalmic science the highest development of medical science, and in ophthalmic practice the highest, most exact application of medical art. Williams, Agnew, Noyes and Norris brought the inspiration

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