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Article
September 21, 1912

THE FINDINGS OF THE TROPOMETER IN 100 NORMAL EYES AND ITS VALUE IN THE STUDY OF STRABISMUS

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

JAMA. 1912;LIX(12):1082-1087. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04270090326060
Abstract

Despite the fact that it is twenty-two years since Stevens introduced his tropometer to the profession (1890), it must be admitted that the instrument has not come into what might be called popular use. It is true that Nicati eighteen years earlier adapted the ordinary perimeter to the rough estimation of the rotational power of the eyes; but to Stevens must belong the credit of devising a thoroughly practical instrument of sufficient mechanical convenience and scientific accuracy to justify its every-day use in ophthalmic practice. To maintain that it is without its limitations would be absurd; and to claim that it is without practical advantages is equally at variance with the facts. The truth, as is usual, is likely to be found midway between these two extremes.

There are many ways of estimating the rotational powers of the eyes, all of more or less use. Casey Wood's method of using

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