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Article
September 21, 1912

THE DILATATION OF BRONCHIAL STRICTURES: NOTES ON THE CLINICAL PATHOLOGY OF BRONCHIARCTIA

Author Affiliations

PITTSBURGH

JAMA. 1912;LIX(12):1123-1127. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04270090367072
Abstract

Bronchial stenoses may be divided into functional and organic. The organic stenoses comprise a number of widely different lesions, but it is only cicatricial stenosis that will be considered in this paper. The chief causes of cicatricial bronchial stenosis are traumatism, syphilis and tuberculosis; or perhaps more accurately, the secondary infections complicating these lesions. Tuberculous processes are of such slow progress, as a rule, that the lung accommodates itself to the altered conditions, and cicatricial bronchial stenoses secondary to tuberculosis rarely require local treatment, though they occur as the result of erosion through the bronchial wall, and I have seen six such cases Cicatricial stenoses, in some instances, may require dilatation in order to secure proper drainage of the infrastrictural bronchiectatic cavity, and thus cure the patient of bronchiectasis with its distressing cough, foul expectoration, dyspnea and lesser symptoms. For syphilitic strictures it may be necessary to use prolonged intubation

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