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September 21, 1912

THE EXPLORATORY NEEDLE PUNCTURE OF THE MAXILLARY ANTRUM IN ONE HUNDRED TUBERCULOUS INDIVIDUALSDEMONSTRATING THE MARKED DISSIMILARITY BETWEEN THE CLINICAL AND POST-MORTEM FINDINGS

JAMA. 1912;LIX(12):1136-1138. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04270090380076
Abstract

Ever since I began to pay especial attention to the accessory sinuses of the nose, it seemed to me that the post-mortem findings of several investigators in sinus disease and pulmonary tuberculosis appeared unreconcilable with clinical findings.

Fränkel,1 in necropsies on forty-five patients who died from pulmonary tuberculosis, found that the sinuses were diseased and that sixteen, or about 35 per cent., contained pathologic secretion.

Harke2 found inflammatory exudate in one or both of the maxillary antra of twenty-three patients, or 60 per cent., out of thirty-eight who had died from pulmonary phthisis.

Minder3 discovered four, or about 23 per cent., in seventeen, and Wertheim,4 thirty-one, or 29 per cent., in 106.

The method employed by these investigators to inspect the sinuses closely adhered to the technic of Harke. This consists in peeling back the scalp in front to the eyes, behind to the foramen magnum,

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