[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.204.178.160. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
October 5, 1912

THE TREATMENT OF CHRONIC INFLUENZA

Author Affiliations

WASHINGTON, D. C.

JAMA. 1912;LIX(14):1288-1289. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04270100056018
Abstract

Early last year I presented a brief monograph on "Chronic Influenza and Its Relation to Neuropathy."1

My interest in the subject of influenza as a chronic infection or intoxication has been increased by the study of an epidemic of influenza at Fort McDowell, California, during the winter of 1910 and 1911. The epidemic, probably imported by recruits en route to the Philippines from other depots, lasted several months. Involvement of the accessory sinuses was not uncommon. Singularly or perhaps naturally the cases in which sinus infection occurred presented evidences of general infection or intoxication for a period of one year during which they were observed. Two cases were followed closely and gave typical pictures of chronic influenza and one case was undoubtedly the source of endemic or sporadic influenza. Both cases showed a persistence of Pfeiffer's bacillus in the nasal and bronchial excretions during the time they were observed

×