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Article
October 12, 1912

EFFECT OF IODIDS ON THE CIRCULATION AND BLOOD-VESSELS IN ARTERIOSCLEROSIS

JAMA. 1912;LIX(15):1350-1352. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04270100118004
Abstract

The iodids have long enjoyed the reputation of exerting a beneficial influence on arteriosclerosis. Their extensive use in this condition has been largely brought about by the enthusiastic teaching of the French school. Huchard1 ascribed to iodids the power "to lower arterial tension, to render more active the nutrition of organs, to effect resolution of degenerative processes in the vesselwalls and to lower peripheral resistance." A belief in their power to improve the mechanical factors of the circulation and to act favorably on the vessel-walls forms the basis of our modern iodid therapy in arteriosclerosis. It will be profitable to weigh the evidence on which this belief rests.

I. EFFECT ON BLOOD-PRESSURE  Potain2 was one of the first to attribute the virtue of iodid to a lowering of blood-pressure, which he considered was brought about by its action on the heart and vasomotor nerves. Animal experiments to determine

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