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Article
October 26, 1912

THE ARTIFICIAL CULTURE OF FILARIAL EMBRYOS: A PRELIMINARY NOTE

Author Affiliations

Professor and Head of the Department of Tropical Medicine, Hygiene and Preventive Medicine, Director of the Laboratories of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Medical Department, Tulane University of Louisiana; Visiting Physician to the Charity Hospital, New Orleans; Assistant in the Laboratories of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene NEW ORLEANS

JAMA. 1912;LIX(17):1531-1532. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04270100299012
Abstract

The earliest success of Bass1 in the cultivation of certain parasitic protozoa (plasmodia) in vitro led one of us (Wellman) to attempt the nurture in artificial mediums of the embryos of Filaria immitis Leidy. At that time a considerable number of positive cultures was obtained, using defibrinated dog's blood inactivated for long periods of time at comparatively low temperatures. Since the return of the malarial expedition of the Tulane University Department of Tropical Medicine from Central America additional work has been completed, employing their technic2 and comparing results with ordinary blood-cultures. A fuller statement of the work thus far accomplished and the details of future progress will be presented later.

Experiments were devised to determine the influence of various whole bloods, serums and diverse mediums, and also the effects of temperature, air, etc., on the cultures.

The embryos live for ten or twelve days in some specimens of

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