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Article
July 9, 1887

LECTURE ON SUBCUTANEOUS BLOOD-INJECTIONS, SALT WATER INFUSION, AND INTRAVENOUS TRANSFUSION.

JAMA. 1887;IX(2):35-39. doi:10.1001/jama.1887.02400010019001a
Abstract

The diseased conditions in which a renewal or repair of the blood seems necessary are so numerous,that the pertinacity with which the question of transfusion is again and again brought before the physician, despite repeated reverses, is easily explained. It is well known that the enthusiasm over the transfusion of the blood of animals (such as sheep), into the human circulation, was brought to an end by the dangers of the operation, and by the publication of the works of Landois, Ponfick, and Panum, which showed that the blood of one species cannot be safely transfused into another species.

At this time (1870-1873) I was experimenting with subcutaneous blood injections, and made a series of subcutaneous injections of animals' blood (lamb, calf, cow) in cases of various diseases in men. The results were anything but satisfactory, as on the one hand there were no noteworthy favorable results, and on the

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