[Skip to Navigation]
Article
January 12, 1889

A CONTRIBUTION TO THE STUDY OF TUMORS.Being part of the Discussion on Tumors at the recent meeting of the New York State Medical Association.

Author Affiliations

OF SYRACUSE, N. Y. LECTURER OX LARYNGOLOGY AND CLINICAL SURGERY, COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY.

JAMA. 1889;XII(2):41-47. doi:10.1001/jama.1889.02400790005001b

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

What constitutes malignity histologically and clinically?

From earliest times tumors were grouped into two classes, the benign and malignant. Long before exact methods of observation permitted closer discrimination, the physician recognized these two groups. From the patient's standpoint, the most important question is whether the tumor is or is not innocent in character. To the surgeon, too, this division of neoplasmata, based as it were upon prognostic considerations is all important. It establishes the time for and the character of any operative interference. It continues the patient under observation for a period of years, or leads to his dismissal after operation. And, therefore, it is proper, though perhaps very unscientific, to view tumors in this light.

What is understood by the malignity of a neoplasm? If we are to consider it synonymous with danger to life, tumors in themselves innocent, would by location become malignant. This is obviously not what

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×