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Article
January 18, 1890

THE CLINIC.

JAMA. 1890;XIV(3):91-92. doi:10.1001/jama.1890.02410030019002

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Abstract

SURGICAL CLINIC AT THE HARLEM HOSPITAL, NEW YORK, DECEMBER 13, 1889.  BY THOMAS H. MANLEY, A.M., M.D., OF NEW YORK.[Reported for The Journal.]

Gentlemen:  —The first case presented for operation is one of strangulated inguinal hernia. The patient, a young man of 24 years, gives a history of having first noticed a swelling on the left side when he was 6 or 7 years old. He wore a truss thereafter almost continuously, until two years ago, when he found that, after leaving it aside, the hernia did not reappear.The features in the clinical history to which we wish to particularly direct attention are, first, the origin of the trouble. The patient was only cognizant of the existence of the hernia when he was 7 years old. The protrusion may not, indeed, have attained sufficient volume to attract notice till this age, but it is pretty certain that the lesion

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