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Article
February 8, 1890

INFANTILE MORTALITY: ITS CAUSATION AND ITS RESTRICTION.Read in the Section of State Medicine at the Fortieth Annual Meeting of the American Medical Association, June, 1889.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF HYGIENE AND PHYSIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY IN THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, DIRECTOR OF THE MICHIGAN STATE LABORATORY OF HYGIENE, MEMBER OF THE MICHIGAN STATE BOARD OF HEALTH, MEMBER OF THE GERMAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY, HONORARY MEMBER OF THE FRENCH SOCIETY OF HYGIENE, ETC.

JAMA. 1890;XIV(6):181-185. doi:10.1001/jama.1890.02410060001001

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Abstract

That the death-rate during the first five years of life should be higher than for the same number of years at any subsequent period might be expected to be true. There are many factors contributing to this result. Some of these are easily recognized, and might be largely eliminated without any great effort. Others are evident, but can not be prevented without radical changes in social life, while still others are obscure. So long as the weak as well as the strong continue to procreate their kind, infantile mortality will be great. So long as tuberculosis, syphilis, and even idiocy are not regarded as bars to the reproduction of the species, weak, diseased and mentally incompetent children will be born; and looking at it from a philosophic standpoint, it is better for the future of the race that many of these should die, but it would be better still had

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