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Article
March 1, 1890

TROPHOPATHY IN THE FATTY AND FIBROID DEGENERATIONS; JOINT PAPER.Read in the Section of Practice of Medicine, Materia Medica and Physiology, at the Fortieth Annual Meeting of the American Medical Association, June, 1889.

Author Affiliations

GOLD MEDALIST OF THE SOCIETY OF SCIENCE, LETTERS AND ART, LONDON; AUTHOR BOYLSTON PRIZE ESSAY FOR 1857 ON "UNDER WHAT CIRCUMSTANCES DO THE USUAL SIGNS FURNISHED BY AUSCULTATION AND PERCUSSION PROVE FALLACIOUS?" PRINCIPAL MEDICAL DEPARTMENT OF INSTRUCTION OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF MICROLOGY, ETC., AND; FORMERLY ATTENDING PHYSICIAN TO DISPENSARY NO. 3 OF THE INTERNATIONAL MEDICAL MISSIONARY SOCIETY.

JAMA. 1890;XIV(9):295-299. doi:10.1001/jama.1890.02410090007001a
Abstract

INTRODUCTION.

The animus of this contribution is the belief of the writers that trophopathy (trophos—food; pathos—disease) has more to do with the cause and cure of the so-called incurable diseases than the profession gives credit to; and to show that our belief is founded on facts, we will immediately proceed to the consideration of the subject in the concrete, to wit: the reading of histories of some patients that have been under our care.

CASE HISTORIES.

Case 1.—A little more than four years ago, a gentleman brought to our office a friend, who appeared to the senior writer almost moribund; indeed, he feared that the man would die then and there. Examination showed the case to be suffering from an enlarged heart, a fibroid liver and Bright's disease of the kidneys; the urine contained albumen, casts and fatty epithelia. We will here make the note that in our study of

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