[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
March 29, 1890

ONE YEAR OF ACETANILIDE IN PEDIATRIC PRACTICE.Read in the Section of Diseases of Children at the Fortieth Annual Meeting of the American Medical Association, June, 1889.

Author Affiliations

PRESIDENT AMERICAN MEDICAL EDITORS' ASSOCIATION; PROFESSOR DISEASES OF CHILDREN; COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS, CONSULTING PHYSICIAN CITY HOSPITAL, ST. LOUIS, MO.

JAMA. 1890;XIV(13):437-441. doi:10.1001/jama.1890.02410130005001a
Abstract

Carbolic acid and its allies, all products of coaltar, have been demonstrated to be of great value.

Of this class none, in my judgment, are superior to acetanilide. This substance was prepared as early as 1853 by Gerhardt, by the action of aniline upon acetychloride, or anhydrous acetic acid, but up to a year or so ago it was not known to possess valuable medicinal properties.

The discoverers of the fact—Cohn and Hepp—that the drug possessed excellent therapeutical qualities gave it a new name, supposed to be more appropriate for use in prescribing, namely, "antifebrin," which name is protected by patent laws, and only the authorized makers and agents can use this term.

"Acetanilide" is in every respect identical with antifebrin, but possesses this advantage, that it is cheaper, and in specifying it we do not cater to the patent medicine trade. It forms colorless, shining plates, melting at 233.6°

×