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July 4, 1914

GASTRO-INTESTINAL STUDIESI. THE QUESTION OF THE RESIDUUM FOUND IN THE EMPTY STOMACH

JAMA. 1914;LXIII(1):11-13. doi:10.1001/jama.1914.02570010013004
Abstract

The routine examination of material from the empty stomach in the morning discloses a small pale yellowish or greenish residue, somewhat cloudy, containing mucus and a little cell débris. We are told by Loeper,1 Zweig,2 Kemp,3 Wolff,4 Strauss,5 Riegel5 and Soupalt5 that in health this residue should not exceed 20 c.c., and that there should be no macroscopic food-residues. It is true that occasionally the microscope discloses fatglobules, cells with their protoplasm digested and their nuclei set free, and rarely vegetable-fibers or meatfibers, but no macroscopic residue is forthcoming.

This is the common finding with the stomach-tube, and the results recorded have gone unquestioned. Only recently Harmer and Dodd,6 by careful Roentgen studies, pointed out that we are by no means sure that the stomach-tube reaches the lowest point of the stomach. In other words, they showed that the stomach-tube, even when

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