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Article
January 1, 1916

THE RESUSCITATION OF THE HEART AFTER ARREST

JAMA. 1916;LXVI(1):32-33. doi:10.1001/jama.1916.02580270036012
Abstract

It is well known that there are circumstances under which an arrest of the heart's action, and consequent death, may occur when this organ itself is not irremediably beyond the power of recovery. The difficulty in the situation is that as soon as the circulation is stopped by a cardiac failure there is no entirely satisfactory practical way of bringing stimuli to bear on the arrested organ that will cause it to resume its function and restore the circulation. Respiratory failure, with its attendant lack of oxygen and accumulation of carbon dioxid, is easily remedied by any of several methods of artificial respiration. Attempts to start the heart in these emergencies have involved massage, electric stimulation and the use of drugs. The latter procedure has encountered almost insuperable obstacles, owing to the difficulty of getting any drug into intimate contact with the whole heart so long as there is no

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